Prague’s main railway station may be getting renamed in memory of Sir Nicholas Winton, who passed away earlier this month.

Often referred to as the ‘British Schindler’, Sir Nicholas saved almost 700 Jewish children during the Second World War and is already honoured by a statue of the humble hero outside the station. Following his death, many Czech’s came to the station in order to place flowers and candles around the statue, which has since prompted the Czech Republic government to consider honouring Sir Nicholas further. Those on European river cruises in 2016 can visit the statue, which is located at the main train station just a five-ten minute walk from Wenceslas Square.

Prague hoping to honour Sir Nicholas further

Firstly, his family will have to agree to the station being named after him, with the transport minister also ensuring a number of steps are taken in order to avoid confusion with the current name of the station. In 2014, Sir Nicholas received the highest Czech Republic honour, which was presented by President Milos Zeman. Previously to this, a special ‘Winton Train’ was also set off from the rail station when the statue was unveiled, with several of the surviving children he saved on board.

In total, he saved 669 Czechoslovakian Jewish children in Bohemia and Moravia from the Nazis by organising their move to Great Britain with the British government. This included arranging eight trains to take the children from Czechoslovakia to London in 1939. According to an article published by the Express, his efforts were relatively unknown, even to his wife, who happened to stumble across a scrapbook in 1988, which named all of the parents and children that he had helped.

Sir Nicholas celebrated his 106th birthday before he died, which was attended by many of the children he managed to save.

Image Credit: Donald Judge (Flickr.com)

This content was written by Angela Sloan. Please feel free to visit my Google+ Profile to read more stories.


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