Speaker of Parliament László Kövér attended the opening ceremony and described how the museum aimed to learn and draw strength from the Hungarian nation’s past, rather than ignore it. The new exhibition shows that 21st century Hungarians still have a thirst for freedom and believe in their ability to run a state, which is emphasised by the country being the first to open a museum of this kind.

Exploring the history of the Hungarian parliament

The museum was formerly open in 1929 to 1949, but was closed by the post WWII communist regime. Originally the Museum of Parliament hosted a 16,000 piece collection, but although this is not on display anymore, there are still a number of the more valuable pieces which are part of the show. This includes artefacts such as Lajos Kossuth’s desk and the prime ministerial chair used by Hungary’s first premier, Lajos Batthyány. Visitors can experience a journey which follows the parliament in Hungary’s history from feudal times to modern day.

People visiting Hungary on European river cruises can attend the museum for no charge during March and April, providing they register on the Parliament’s website. Aside from the currently running exhibition, there will also be two additional collections, which are set to open in the building of the National Assembly. This includes one which introduces the Parliament building and artwork, and another which explores the lapidary trade.

The Parliament’s visitor centre has been in charge of the project, which has cost approximately €987,000, made possible by the Imre Steindl Programme. Tourists can also book guided tours of the Hungarian Parliament building, which is the third largest of its kind and is situated in Budapest on the Danube River.

Image Credit: Dimitry B. (Flickr.com)

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